The island of Sark is arguably the least known and least visited of the Channel Islands. It is a romantic hideaway from the pressures of the modern world, and one of its charms is the lack of tourist infrastructure. The fact that the only means of transport is by foot, bicycle, tractor or horse and carriage, only serve to add to its overall appeal. Contrast it with the urban living on mainland Britain and it is a formula that will captivate anyone who sets foot on these shores. The Island was Europe's last sole surviving feudal state; with its constitution dating back to the Elizabethan period. The Island is three and a half miles in length and a mile and a half wide and actually comprises of two islands, Big Sark and Little Sark, which are joined by the thin isthmus "La Coupee". During the World War II period, Sark was occupied by the Germans and whilst under their command enhancements were made to the island itself, including some well engineered tunnels, which, to this day can be seen.. Sark has amazing topography with an average land height of only 250 feet above sea level. The flora can be dazzling in its diversity with spring showing off a host of blue and yellow flowers. Set against the secluded sandy beaches, huge cliffs, coves and caves, this is a channel destination without peers. For the Visitor there is a wide range of accommodation available, from award-winning hotels and restaurants, to self-catering and campsites. More...

The Island that's different from the moment of landing in Sark you enter an entirely different world. The tempo of modern movement ceases, the change is sudden, dramatic. People no longer pass swiftly, silently preoccupied in their infinite purposes.More...

Spring and the Guillemots are back on Les Autelets Sark after a hard winters fishing.

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